Monthly Archives: September 2015

Works in Progress, 2D and 3D.

S-Bahn_WIP_Suzanne_Forbes_2015 - EditedI started this drawing on the S-Bahn and haven’t had occasion to ride the S again for a bit, so it’s on hold til I do! I thought the amount of correction and adjustment that goes into any drawing might be of interest.

I’m almost done with the mantis- her feet turned out to want to look like a ballerina in toe shoes, and I’m rolling with it. Her wings are made of two kinds of patterned sheer green organza and one kind of green fibrous paper, layered in an embroidery hoop and stitched together with fine wire.mantis WIP Suzanne Forbes

First project in our new home.

beetle_Suzanne_Forbes_Sept_2015Yes, I love bugs and I cannot lie.

This is the first project I finished in our new home, a small but very detailed embroidery using multiple gauges and types of metallic thread to sort of drill down into the shiny carapace. The idea is that stringing a fine web of metallic thread over a two or three color satin-stitch fade will help to make it shine without obscuring the color, like interferent paints.

Our new kitchen has amazing light, and it has rapidly become my favorite workspace for detailed handwork. It’s kind of a construction site, since like many traditional Berlin rentals it was a BYOK- Bring Your Own Kitchen- and we get a little into setting it up, then run out of money and take a break. But I love it anyway, so much. Working in here, I am as happy as I’ve ever been.kitchen

A little old-time music, and Google Translate is in love with death.

suzanne forbes drawing 2015I made this drawing at the Barkin Kitchen Fish Fry, on a lovely deck overlooking the river in an area where artists have built their own apartment buildings.

These guys are The Curtis Tembeck Outlaw Party.

death machines - Edited

Also, Google Translate is scaring me tonight.

Instead of craigslist or regular eBay, most people here use eBay Kleinanzeigen to sell their stuff. It’s free local classifieds.

Because I am broke, insanely cheap, and still missing some 75% of the items one needs to run a household, I buy things there.

I just wanted a used food processor for 10 euros and a cheap dresser I could paint black.

grandma
Not anything to do with the founder of time.founder of time

yes chunksDisturbed, I went to another site and attempted to buy cat litter. (German cat litter SUCKS raw eggs.)

Look what you can get! Sure, we all know that’s what most canned cat food is, but do they have to be so blunt about it? They’re Germans, of course they do.cat sticks

If you think “Cat sticks” sounds like Pocky for cats, you are correct, and Morgan loves them.

 

I’ll leave you with this charming sentiment about cat litter: “What pleases the Stubentiger now?

what pleases the stubentiger now

Drawing tutorial: How to draw a perfect eye.

Original eyeball drawing by Suzanne Forbes 2015

Your eyeball is a gelid sphere.

Intellectually, you know this. You can feel it, round as a ball bearing, spinning in the aqueous humour of your eye socket.

Yet most people instinctively draw the eye as two ellipses, meeting at their pointed ends. ()

Eye drawings by Suzanne Forbes 2015This is a perfectly serviceable beginning, but it’s only the beginning of understanding the proportions and dynamics of a human eye. First, consider the pupil. It takes up a relatively small amount of the eyeball sphere, but nearly a third of the visible eye.

We see only a section of the eyeball, one orange segment.

The rest is hidden behind eyelids and the fine skin that stretches over the eye socket, from the browbone and zygomatic arch. If you touch your eye sockets with your fingertips, you can feel all the eyeball underneath that thin skin, and all the floaty liquid that cradles your eyeball in its bone housing.

Your eyelids are like slices of baloney draped around your eyeball.

Like wrapping a baseball in horsehide, the eyelid skin has to follow the curve of the sphere. The skin has thickness of its own, a couple of millimeters.

The eyelashes project from the leading edge of the top surface of the eyelid, not from that couple-millimeter perpendicular plane. You’d be awfully sad if your eyelids didn’t have thickness.Eye drawings by Suzanne Forbes 2015

The pupil has dimension that makes it project forward a bit beyond the eye sphere, and when the thin eyelid passes over that extra dimension it makes a little extra curve to follow it. The highlight on an oily or made-up eyelid will be noticeably located over that curve.

Your browbone and cheekbones project further out than the corners of your eyes, because the sphere of your eye is smaller than the roundness of your skull.

Put your fingertip on the inner corner of your eyebrow, rest your palm on your mouth, and blink. You see how much space there is at the inner corner of your eye, where your tear duct is? If you have an epicanthic fold, that space will have thin skin stretched over it, but you can gently press to feel the curve of your eyeball. The sphere of your eyeball curves back into your skull, leaving a shadowed hollow below your brow. This also means that the whites of your eyes are brightest around the pupil and shadowed at the corners, by the core shadow of the sphere itself.

Your eyeball is shadowed by the thickness of your eyelid as well.

That cast shadow curves around the sphere just like the eyelids, and throws darkness into the top of the iris. The highlight on the pupil will sit right at this meridian of cast shadow. The shadowing of the iris is especially pronounced in people with an epicanthic fold, because the skin over the eyeball is projecting out further over the surface of the eye.

If you really want to understand the shape of your eyeball, try putting on false lashes a few times.

Very few experiences bring home the structure of the eye like the pain-in-the-ass process of applying falsies!

I hope this look at your gelid spheres is helpful; I’ll be happy to answer any questions in the comments.

That’s it for this time. Maybe next time we’ll talk about the most crucial thing you need to know to draw a perfect hand.